Pawns moving sideways

Last week I played black against the redoubtable Charles Riordan (2330) and my f-pawn took a roundabout trip. From f5 it captured a pawn on g4. Then via another capture it went to f3 (politely passing his f pawn on f4) and then another capture landed on e2. It’s certainly routine to have a pawn wind up on an adjacent file – but not after having sidestepped in the other direction first.

That’s my e pawn on h2 This reminds me of a long-ago game in Kentucky. Rated 1300 at the time, I found myself paired against 1800-rated Don Ifill, who always played a Hedgehog setup, regardless of color. I don’t know the exact move order but we arrived at the diagram via something like:

1.e3 e5 2.Ne2 d5 3.g3 c6 4.Bg2 Bd6 5.d3 f5 6.Nd2 Nf6 7.b3 0-0 8.Bb2 f4 9.exf4 exf4 10.0-0 Bg4 11.f3 fxg3 12.fxg4 gxh2+ 13.Kh1 Ng4.

So that’s my former e-pawn camped out on h2, having scuttled across the board sideways like a crab. (Not an Alaskan King Crab though – they are unusual in that they can walk forwards.) Ultimately I landed a cheapshot …Rg7-g1 mate, anchored by the wandering pawn.

Anybody else have a good sideways pawn story?

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3 thoughts on “Pawns moving sideways

  1. Hmmm…well, no Crab Pawn stories from here. That position you’ve posted is interesting, and I’m still trying to decide who’s better. You have the rest of the score?

  2. You know, this is one of life’s little tragedies. I have probably 95% of my game scores from 25 years of tournament play. But that one is lost and while I know how it ended, I haven’t figured out how to get from the diagram to the ending. Even though it was maybe only 12 to 15 more moves.

  3. Alright, I’m glad you asked. I think I have reconstructed it. An interesting forensic exercise.

    The discerning viewer will quickly realize this is not a master game of chess. (I think White was coasting…)

    1.e3 e5 2.Ne2 d5 3.g3 c6 4.Bg2 Bd6 5.d3 f5 6.Nd2 Nf6 7.b3 0-0 8.Bb2 f4 9.exf4 exf4 10.0-0 Bg4 11.f3 fxg3 12.fxg4 gxh2+ 13.Kh1 Ng4 14.Nf3 Ne3 15.Qd2 Nxf1 16.Rxf1 Nd7 17. Ned4 Qe7 18.Re1 Qf7 19.Ng5 Qh5 20.Nde6 Rfe8 21.Bh3 Re7 22.Re2 h6 23.Rg2 hxg5 24.Rxg5 Qh6 25.Rxg7+ Rxg7 26.Qxh6 Rg1++

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